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PostSubject: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:21 pm





Are you Interested in Coins?
I like probably everyone else in the country, are collecting the new Quarters..
And the New Nickels and Whatever else they come up with new...
But I'm also interested in Older Coins..So when I find something Interesting about them ...I add them to this page...
And if you know something interesting about a coin or coins...Please let us know..


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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:25 pm

The Nickels

2004 Nickels

Thanks to the Westward Journey Nickel Series. America's nickel has changed for the first time in 66 years! Two new designs took their turns on the back of the nickel in 2004, while the image of President Thomas Jefferson on the front was the same as the image on earlier nickels. But the front of the 2005 nickels show a new image of Jefferson as well.

The new designs celebrate two events of about 200 years before: the Louisiana Purchase and the westward journey of Lewis and Clark.

When Thomas Jefferson was President of the United States, he bought a piece of land from France called "Louisiana, an area much larger than the state of Louisiana today...so large, in fact, that buying it made the United States twice as large as it had been before. Since Thomas Jefferson was already on the nickel, it was the perfect coin on which to celebrate the Louisiana Purchase.

In 1804, President Jefferson sent a group led by Lewis and Clark to explore this land, to describe the flora (plants) and fauna (animals) they saw, and to find a water route to the Pacific Ocean if there was one.

2004

Jefferson had a medal made as a token of peace, which we call his "Peace Medal." The explorers were to give the medals as gifts to the Native American chiefs they met as a sign of peace.

The design that was used on Jefferson's Peace Medal is used on the first of the new nickels, The Peace Medal Nickel. It shows the hand of a Native American and the hand of a European-American clasped in a friendly handshake below a crossed pipe and tomahawk. the words. "Louisiana Purchase" are inscribed above the date of the purchase, 1803.

The second nickel of 2004 shows the keelboat that was part of the transportation for Lewis and Clark's expedition. In this Keelboat Nickel design, captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark are standing on deck at the start of their famous trip.

from http://www.usmint.gov/kids/index.cfm?fileContents=cointNews/newNickel.cfm


2004 Thomas Edison Commemorative Silver Dollar


Of all the inventions that Thomas Alva Edison worked on during his 60 year career, the light bulb was one of the hardest. His light bulb burned a little wire called a "a filament" to make light., But every material he tried to use just burned up too quickly.
But Edison was a born inventor, curious and hard-working,. His recipe for a genius was one percent inspiration and 99 percent persparation. After many trials and thousands of notes. he found that the best filament for his light bulb was a specially treated cotton thread. Even that filament burned for only a few hours in 1879... But with more work , light bulb filaments were made to last for hundreds of hours each , lighting homes and cities around the world. Today cities glowing with Edison's light can be seen from outer space!

Edison created or helped refine probably more modern wonders than any other one person. The work that sprang from his Menlo Park, New Jersey, lab earned him the nickname "The Wizard of Menlo Park." This commemorative coin honors Edison for his outstanding work

On the Silver Dollar is Edison holding one of his first light bulbs 125 years ago the light bulb itself is featured on the back of the coin.

2005 Nickels

The new design on the front of the 2005 nickels features a new image of Thomas Jefferson. The word "Liberty" appears in a style that is like Jefferson's own handwriting.

The first new 2005 design on the nickel's reverse (back) features the American bison, also called a buffalo. This animal used to roam the plains in such great numbers that the animal was noted often by Lewis and Clark in their journals. This buffalo also reminds us of the American Indians who counted on the animal for food, clothing, and shelter, and of all the wildlife that the explorers wrote about and brought back to the United States as a record for science.

The second reverse design shows a view of the Pacific Ocean, the goal that the Lewis and Clark Expedition reached after more than a year of hard travel. The scene surrounds a quote written by Captain Clark: "Ocean in view! O! The Joy!"

Hopes were dashed when the Expedition proved that the Missouri River was not part of the Northwest Passage across the continent by water and that there were two mountain ranges to cross instead of one. Still, less than a century later, the continent was crossed by telegraph and railroad lines that brought the eastern and western coasts together in ways hard to imagine in Lewis and Clark's time. Today, with cars, airplanes, telephones, and computers, the distance between coasts seems even shorter..but the steps that Lewis and Clark took were among the first to bring them so close together

from http://www.usmint.gov/kids/index.cfm?fileContents=coinNews/newNickel.cfm


2006 Nickels

Just as Lewis and Clark came full circle, returning to the East and Jefferson's home in Monticello, the "Return to Monticello" Nickel brings the Westward Journey Nickel series back to its beginnings: Thomas Jefferson on the front and his home, Monticello, on the back. And yet, how the coin has changed!

The final obverse design in the series features a new portrait of Jefferson. And, instead of the usual side view, Jefferson faces forward. This design marks the first time a presidential bust on a circulating American coin is not shown in profile.

The reverse design, although very much like the pre-2004 design, is actually very different. The new image takes advantage of the advances in coin-making technology to produce a crisper, more detailed Monticello than has ever been seen on the five-cent coin.

more information about coins at
http://www.usmint.gov/gov/kids/index.cfm?fileContents=coinNews/newNickel.cfm
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:26 pm

1999
Delaware
Pennsylvania
New Jersey
Georgia
Connecticut

2000
Massachusetts
Maryland
South Carolina
New Hampshire
Virginia

2001
New York
North Carolina
Rhode Island
Vermont
Kentucky

2002
Tennessee
Ohio
Louisiana
Indiana
Mississippi

2003
Illinois
Alabama
Maine
Missouri
Arkansas

2004
Michigan
Florida
Texas
Iowa
Wisconsin

2005
California
Minnesota
Oregon
Kansas
West Virginia

2006
Nevada
Nebraska
Colorado
North Dakota
South Dakota
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:27 pm

Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Silver Dollar

In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson Purchased the vast area called "Louisiana" and asked his 27 year-old secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to form an expedition to check out this new land.
Lewis invited his friend William Clark to co-lead the expedition.

In May of 1804, the Lewis and Clark expedition of about 50 men left St. Louis, Missouri, calling themselves "The Corps of Discovery". Over the following two and a half years, thirty-three of the explorers not only reached the Pacific Ocean and returned, but kept detailed journals of all the plants, animals, lands, and peoples they met with along the way. Lewis and Clark's expedition opened a new chapter in the history of the growth of the United States.

Lewis and Clark and their "Corps of Discovery" are American Heroes, and their expedition was a triumph for the young United States. What a model of harmony the Corps of Discovery is for America today, as an American Indian Woman, an African-American Man, and dozens of mixed-heritage soldiers all worked together to make their mission succeed. They not only mapped a route across the continent to the Pacific Ocean, but made friends with the learned about the Indian Nations along their route.

Part of making friends meant giving gifts like blue beads, iron tools, flags, and uniforms...but above all, silver "Peace Medals," stamped with the sign of peace that everyone knows; hands clasped in friendship. Presidents had given such medals before, and presidents after continued to give them through most of that century.

To celebrate that adventure of 200 years ago, a new commemorative silver dollar has been created.
Donna Weaver, one of the sculptor/engravers at the United States Mint, created the coin's designs.

On the front, captain Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stand on a stream bank planning another day of travel and exploration.

The design on the back includes two feathers and seventeen stars, symbols that also appear in the insignia of the national Coucil of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial, the group sponsoring the coin along with the National Park service. The feathers stand for the many American Indian cultures that explores met; the seventeen stars are for the number of states in the Union in 1804 and during the journey

A circle in the center surrounds the design used on Jefferson's Peace Medal. In addition to the symbloic handshake of Peace, the Peace Medal design shows a pipe crossed with a tomahawk and the motto "Peace and Friendship"

www.usmint.gov
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:30 pm

Quarters Issued in 1999

Delaware
State Nickname - The First State
Capital - Dover
Statehood - December 7, 1787

Delaware quarter shows Patriot Caesar Rodney on his 1776 historic ride.
Rodney made the 80 mile ride through terrible heat and thunderstorms to cast his vote in favor of Delaware signing the Declaration of Independence. Rodney's vote turned out to be the tie-breaker

In 1787, 11 years after Caesar Rodney's historic ride, Delaware voted unanimously to ratify the United States Constitution. It was the first state to do so. Five years later, in 1792. Delaware adopted a new state constitution and changed its name from Delaware State to the State of Delaware


for more information you can go to www.usmint.gov

1999 Pennsylvania Quarter
State Nickname - The Keystone State
Capital - Harrisburg
Statehood - December 12, 1787

Pennsylvania quarter shows the state's keystone, Commonwealth Statue, and
state motto "Virtue, Liberty, Independence"
atop an outline of the state. The Commonwealth statue has been on top of the state's capitol dome since May 25th 1905. Her right arm is extended in Mercy; Her left arm holds a ribbon mace to symbolize Justice.

During the Civil War, Pennsylvania earned its nickname as the "Keystone State." its location was seen as a "Key" or critical stone in the colonies' wall against attack from the South. The Battle of Gettysburg, a critical turning point in the war, took place in the southeast corner of Pennsylvania

for more information www.usmint.gov

[center]1999 New Jersey Quarter

State Nickname - The Garden State
Capital - Trenton
Statehood - December 18, 1787

New Jersey quarter shows General George Washington leading his troops across the Delaware River to Trenton, New Jersey. During the next 10 days, the Colonial Army beat the British at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. The coin design is based on an 1851 painting by Emmanuel Leutze

New Jersey's location put it at the heart of many famous Revolutionary battles and earned it the nickname "Crossroads of the Revolution." It was before the Battle of Trenton that George Washington made his famous surprise crossing of the Delaware on Christmas night to defeat the Hessian Army.



for more information www.usmint.gov

[center]1999 Georgia Quarter

State Nickname - The Peach State
Capital - Atlanta
Statehood - January 2, 1788

Atop an outline of the state, the Georgia quarter has a peach (the state symbol), branches from a Live Oak Tree (the state tree), and a banner with "Wisdom, Justice, Moderation" (the state motto). Georgia has long been called the "Peach State."

The last of the 13 original colonies, it was named Georgia in honor of King George II. In 1732, this English King granted a charter to found the colony. He wanted it to be a haven for the poor and unemployed, and for persecuted Protestants from Germany and Austria. James E. Oglethorpe led about 120 people to the colony in 1733.

[center]1999 Connecticut Quarter

State Nickname - The Constitution State
Capital - Hartford
Statehood - January 9, 1788

The Connecticut quarter shows the famous Charter Oak tree that hid the charter won from Britain's King Charles II in 1662. This charter established Connecticut's boundaries and self-rule. In 1687, Captain Joseph Wadsworth saved the charter from the hands of the British, hiding it safely in this tree.

Even after Connecticut became a state in 1788, it continued to use the 1662 British Charter as its constitution (the charter hidden safely in the Charter Oak Tree). In fact Connecticut used the charter for more than 300 years, until a new state constitution was adopted in 1965


for more information www.usmint.gov


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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:33 pm

2000 Massachusetts Quarter

State Nickname - The Bay State
Capital - Boston
Statehood - February 6, 1788

Atop an outline of the state, the Massachusetts quarter shows a star over Boston, the state's capital. It also has the state's nickname ("The Bay State") and the famous Minuteman Statue. Year round, this statue stands guard at the 900-acre Minute Man National Historical Park in Concord, Massachusetts

During the American Revolutionary War, many citizens were on call to fight when needed. These soldiers were called "Minutemen" because they could be ready for battle at a minute's notice. Who had the idea to use a minuteman on the Massachusetts quarter? Two kids- a sixth and seventh grader! In fact, only kids could submit quarter designs in the 1998 contest held by Governor Paul Cellucci.

2000 Maryland Quarter

State Nickname - The Old Line State
Capital - Annapolis
Statehood - April 28, 1788

The Maryland quarter shows the State house Dome, located in Annapolis. The dome is surrounded by branches of leaves from the State Tree (White Oak) and the state's nickname ("The Old Line State"). Some people believe General George Washington gave the state this nickname as a way to honor the Maryland Line Troops, who served in many Revolutionary War battles.

Maryland's State House is the oldest one still used regularly by a legislature. Started in 1772, the building wasn't totally finished until 1797. A lot happened during those 25 years to delay construction, including at least one hurricane and the Revolutionary War. From November 1783 to August 1784, the Continental Congress met in the unfinished state house, using it to sign the Treaty of Paris that ended the Revolutionary War.

[center]2000 South Carolina Quarter

State Nickname - The Palmetto State
Capital - Columbia
Statehood - May 23, 1788

Atop the outline of the state, the South Carolina quarter shows a star over Columbia, the state's capital. The quarter also has the state tree (Palmetto), state flower (Yellow Jessamine), state bird (Carolina Wren), and state Nickname ("The Palmetto State')

The Palmetto tree also decorates the state's flag and seal. Why is this tree so important to South Carolina? Because its wood helped defeat the British at the Battle of Sullivan's Island. When the British fired cannonballs at Fort Moultrie, the fort's spongy Palmetto Logs absorbed the shock of the cannonballs. The fort came out unharmed, and the colonists had their first naval victory of the American Revolution!

[center]2000 New Hampshire Quarter

State Nickname - The Granite State
Capital - Concord
Statehood - June 21, 1788

The New Hampshire quarter shows the state's most famous natural rock formation, the Old Man of the Mountain. His rock face is 25 feet wide and measures 40 feet from chin to forehead. Geologic events carved this profile into the granite ledges 200 million years ago.

On the coin, the Old Man is looking across at nine stars and the state's motto. The stars represent New Hampshire's place as the ninth state to join the union. General John Stark, a Revolutionary War Hero, is credited with the words. "Live Free or Die." They come from a toast he wrote for the 32nd anniversary of the Battle of Bennington Victory. "Live Free or Die, Death is not the Worst of Evils."


[center]2000 Virginia Quarter

State Nickname - The Old Dominion
Capital - Richmond
Statehood - June 25, 1788

The Virginia quarter honors our nation's oldest colony, Jamestown, Virginia. The three ships on the coin --Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery--brought the first English colonist here in the spring of 1607.

Loaded with cargo and 104 boys and men, the ships set sail from London on December 20, 1606. Nearly five months later, they landed on a small island along the James River. The crew formed the first permanent colony in the New World, 13 years before Plymouth, Massachusetts, was settled. They named it Jamestown in honor of King James I, who had chartered their voyage.


for more information www.usmint.gov

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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:36 pm

2001 Kentucky Quarter

State Nickname - The Bluegrass State
Capital - Frankfort
Statehood - June 1, 1792

Shows a mansion with a thoroughbred racehorse behind a fence and the words "My Old Kentucky Home." Kentucky was the first state on the western frontier to join the Union and home of the longest running annual horse race in the country, The Kentucky Derby, which is followed by horseracing lovers all over the world. The famous Kentucky Bluegrass country is also grazing ground for some of the world's finest racehorses
Behind the horse, you'll also see another famous symbol of Kentucky, the Bardstown house where Stephen Foster wrote the state song, "My Old Kentucky Home."

2001 Vermont Quarter

State Nickname - The Green Mountain State
Capital - Montpelier
Statehood - March 4, 1791

The Vermont quarter celebrates America's favorite sweet tooth with an image of Maple Trees being tapped for syrup against a background of Camel's Hump Mountain.
The first state admitted to the Union after the original 13 colonies. Vermont is known as the "Green Mountain State" because of its beautiful mountains coverd in evergreen trees. But it's Maple Trees are more important to most American Kids. By putting a little metal device (sort of like a water spigot) into each tree, the sap can be collected to make a delicious, brown syrup. Still a favorite with pancake eaters across the country, it was America's biggest source of sugar until the early 1800's, when cane sugar- the kind you find in sugar bowls now--was introduced.

[center]2001 Rhode Island Quarter

State Nickname - The Ocean State
Capital - Providence
Statehood - May 29, 1790

The Rhode Island Quarter honors the "Ocean State."
And its most popular sport with a sailboat gliding through Narragansett Bay, past the Pell Bridge, which links the towns of Newport and Jamestown.
Rhode Island may be the smallest state in the union, but it has more than 400 miles of coastline. known as the sailing capital of world, Rhode Island was home to the Americas Cup for more than 50 years. This famous sailboat race, which always takes place in the home port of the previous year's winner, draws sailors from all over the world.

[center]2001 North Carolina Quarter

State Nickname - The Tar Heel State
Capital - Raleigh
Statehood - November 21, 1789

The North Carolina Quarter celebrates the first airplane flight, with a picture of Orville and Wilbur Wright's plane taking off, and the inscription "First Flight." They said it couldn't be done. But on December 17, 1903 at the beach near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, a man actually flew through the air.
The pilot was Orville Wright, who with his brother, Wilbur, designed the first motorized flying machine. Called the Flyer, it traveled a distance of approximately 37 meters (120 feet) on its first flight, staying in the air for twelve seconds. The Wright brothers chose the Kill Devil Hills beach near Kitty Hawk for a good reason. They had soft sand for a gentler landing.

2001 New York Quarter[center]
State Nickname - The Empire State
Capital - Albany
Statehood - July 26, 1788

The New York Quarter features the Statue of liberty against an outline of the state, with the inscription
"Gateway to Freedom."
One of our nation's most beloved symbols of Freedom, "Lady Liberty" has stood in New York City's Harbor, welcoming immigrants to our country since 1886.
A gift from the people of France, she is made of steel covered in copper and stands 151 feet tall, from the ground to the tip of her torch. Her pinky finger alone is 8 feet long. Lady Liberty has guided the way for millions who have entered New York by boat--maybe even your own great, great grandparents. One of the best-known American landmarks, she was designatged a National Monument in 1924.
If you look closely at the image of the state, you'll also see a line indicating the Erie Canal, which was important to the growth of New York's business and population in the early 1800's.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:39 pm

2002 Mississippi Quarter

State Nickname - The Magnolia State
Capital - Jackson
Statehood December 10, 1817

Pierre Magnol is the plant scientist who named the Magnolia. It's popular throughout the South even though it originally came from Asia
In 1900, Mississippi school children were asked to choose a state flower. The magnolia flower won easily, but the state's legislature didn't make it the official state flower until 1952. In 1935, school children voted again, this time for a state tree. The Magnolia tree won, and it became official only three years later, in 1938.
Governor Ronnie Musgrove sent three ideas to the Mint for its artists to work on. From the three final designs that the Mint sent back to him, he chose "The Magnolia State" as the final quarter design.

2002 Indiana Quarter

State Nickname - The Hoosier State
Capital - Indianapolis
Statehood - December 11,1816

The Nineteen Quarter Belongs to the Nineteenth State to join the Union, And it features nineteen stars for just that reason. Along with the stars and an outline of the state of Indiana, a race car is also part of the design because the world-famous Indianapolis 500 is raced there.
The race takes place at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, which was built in 1909 to test cars. Car makers still use the Speedway to test cars, but it's most famous for the races, which have been held there since 1911 every year except during the two world wars.
Indiana citizens voted on their favorite designs and Governor O'Bannon picked "Crossroads of America" from the top four designs that the Mint prepared.


[center]2002 Louisiana Quarter

State Nickname - The Pelican State
Capital - Baton Rouge
Statehood - April 30, 1812

Music flows in this quarter's design. The state of louisiana expecially New Orleans is where Jazz was born, a type of music that's enjoyed all over the world. Below the sounding trumpet is a pelican, the state bird. In the background is an outline of the Louisiana Purchase and its place in the United States.
Fifteen million dollars sounds like a lot of money, but the Louisiana Territory was such a big piece of land that it about doubled the size of the United States in 1803. The Purchase has been called "the greatest real estate deal in history."
Most of the ideas for the coin's design came from school children. State Governor Mike Foster picked the final "Louisana Purchase" design from the five that the mint developed.


[center]2002 Ohio Quarter

State Nickname - The Buckeye State
Capital - Columbus
Statehood - March 1, 1803

An astronaut and a biplane decorate an outline of the state because of the part Ohio played in travel by air and space
Two famous astronauts, Neil Armstrong and John Glenn, were both born in Ohio. So was one of the Inventors of the airplane
The Governor finally chose "Birthplace of Aviation Pioneer's" as the design that would appear on the state's quarter.

[center]2002 Tennessee Quarter

State Nickname - The Volunteer State
Capital - Nashville
Statehood - June 1, 1796

It's all about Music. It has three stars that stand for the state's three area's and three musical instruments for the state's three most popular kinds of music.
A Fiddle stands for the Bluegrass music of the Mountains of East Tennessee. A Guitar stands for the Country music of Central Tennessee, where Nashville is. A Trumpet stands for the Blues of West Tennessee and the City of Memphis
The Governor Don Sundquist chose "Musical Heritage" as the final design for the state's Quarter.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:42 pm

2003 Arkansas Quarter

State Nickname - The Natural State
Capital - Little Rock
Statehood - June 15, 1836

Arkansas quarter is called the "The Natural State" because of its many natural resources, including streams, lakes, farmland, wildlife,and minerals.
Visitors to Arkansas can hunt for fish, ducks, and even diamonds! One of the diamond mines there may be the oldest in North America, and the only one that people can visit and visitors can keep what they find. Since Arkansas also produces lots of rice, the picture on the quarter (Rice stalks, a Diamond, and a Duck flying over a lake in a forest) make a nice symbol of the richness of Arkansas.


2003 Missouri Quarter

State Nickname - The Show Me State
Capital - Jefferson City
Statehood - August 10, 1821

The past and the present are combined in the Missouri quarter design, Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery set out to navigate the Missouri River in 1804, and the Gateway Arch was built in 1965.
Putting the two features together tells what an important part Missouri played in Americans moving west. For a number of years, Missouri was the state farthest west in the United States, so it was a good place for settlers to form wagon trains and begin their Journeys. even though Missouri was not yet a state in 1804 (it was still part of the Louisiana Territory), St Charles was a city, and the Corps of Discovery used it as the starting point for their history-making exploration.


[center]2003 Maine Quarter

State Nickname - The Pine Tree State
Capital - Augusta
Statehood - March 15, 1820

Maine became the 23rd state as part of the Missouri Compromise. Every morning, the sun shines in Maine first because it's the easternmost state, and every night, Maine's Lighthouses help to keep ships safe.
This quarter shows the lighthouse at Pemaquid Point. Congress paid to have the lighthouse built six years after Maine became a state (1826), and the light still guides ships around the shoals in its bays.
The ship on the quarter looks like the schooner Victory Chimes of the WindJammer fleet. WindJammers are sailboats that used to carry cargo and passengers to different ports. Both windjammers and lighthosues played an important part in Maine's shipping history.

[center]2003 Alabama Quarter

State Nickname - The Yellowhammer State
Capital - Montgomery
Statehood - December 14, 1819

The Alabama Quarter celebrates the Spirit of Courage. Above the "Spirit of Courage" banner is the image of Helen Keller, a truly courageous woman. Although she couldn't see or hear, she worked hard to do some amazing things, such as write books, give speeches, read raised letters and Braille, and earn a degree at college.
Braille is a special code of raised dots that stand for letters, so many languages can be written in Braille for blind people around the World. In the image, Ms Keller is reading from a Braille book, and her name is written on the coin in Braille letters.


[center]2003 Illinois Quarter

State Nickname - The Prairie State
Capital - Springfield
Statehood - December 13,1818

21 stars surround the 21st state (Illinois) on the 21st quarter (of the 50 State Quarter Program) as we enter the 21st Century.
The Illinois Quarter looks forward to the new century as it reminds us of how Abraham Lincoln must have looked forward to his new career in Law from his Job as a young rail-splitter. In the image, Lincoln is setting his farm tool aside and picking up his Law Book, the farm behind him and the city of Chicago ahead. He went on to become one of our greatest Presidents.
This "Land of Lincoln" design speaks of both the history and furture of the "The Prairie State."
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:45 pm

2004 Wisconsin Quarter

State Nickname - The Badger State
Capital - Madison
Statehood - May 29, 1848

Wisconsin, which became the 30th state on May 29th 1848, is moving "Forward" with a farming theme for its quarter design. A statewide vote selected the "Agriculture/Dairy/Barns" theme over the other two Candidates, "Scenic Wisconsin" and "Early Exploration and Cultural Interaction."
Wisconsin can be called the dairy capital of the world. It has more Milk Cows than any other state and produces more than 15 percent of the nation's Milk. It takes about 17,000 dairy farms and more than a million cows to produced Wisconsin's more than 17,000 pounds of milk each year... Not to mention more than 350 different kinds of cheese. The state is also a major corn-growing state
Wisconsin, wanting to to be a leader among the states, adopted "Forward" as the state motto in 1851.


2004 Iowa Quarter

State Nickname - The Hawkeye State
Capital - Des moines
Statehood - December 28, 1846

Iowa was the 29th state to join the Union. The quarters design is based on a painting by Grant Wood, who lived in Iowa. The painting shows a teacher and her students planting a tree near their country schoolhouse.
The painting illustrates Iowa's "Foundation in Education." Iowans have cared about education since the state's earliest days. When Iowa became a state in 1846, it already had several schools in each of it's counties. Iowa's first high school opened a few years later even though there weren't many high schools in other states until after 1900.
The image of a tree being planted also shows how Iowans care about the environment and about agriculture. Growing fruits and vegetables has always been an important part of Iowa's history
The name of the artist, Grant Wood, appears below the image of his painting called "Arbor Day"

[center]2004 Texas Quarter

State Nickname - The Lone Star State
Capital - Austin
Statehood - December 29, 1845

On December 29, 1845, Texas entered the Union. But the road to statehood was a rocky one, with four other flags flying over Texas before it became state number 28, and one other flag afterward. Many countries wanted the land that is now Texas, including Spain, France, and Mexico. After many battles, Texas won it's independence and became its own Republic. About nine years later, Texas became part of the United States.
The flag of the Republic of Texas is now the state flag. It's single five-pointed white star shines from a field of blue, bordered with horizontal stripes of white above the red below. Though Texas is famous for Oil Wells, Cowboys, and Chili, perhaps nothing stands for Texas Spirit like that single star shown on this new quarters.
A rope encircles an outline of the state behind a lone star, labeled "The Lone Star State."


[center]2004 Florida Quarter

State Nickname - The Sunshine State
Capital - Tallahassee
Statehood - March 3, 1845

This state's chosen design features a space shuttle and a Spanish Galleon, and links the state to the phrase "Gateway to Discovery."
Florida is the southernmost state in our country (besides Hawaii) the state with the highest average temperature and the second longest shoreline. Tourists are as happy to discover its beaches and water activities as Ponce de Leon was in 1513 to discover the tropical beauty of the land he named "Pascua Florida" (meaning "Flowery Easter")
Florida is also the state from which many missions are launched to explore space. Most U.S. space missions blast off from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral near Orlando. So, from the New World to new worlds in space, Florida is truly the Gateway to Discovery.
A 16th centruy Spanish ship arrives and a 20th century space shuttles leaves the land of Florida.


[center]2004 Michigan Quarter

State Nickname - The Wolverine State
Capital - Lansing
Statehood - January 26, 1837

This new quarter shows the Mitten-Shaped outline of Michigan and the surrounding Great Lakes (Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario). These lakes, which together make the largest body of fresh water in the world, have played a major part in Michigan's history and economy,. The lakes have brought many tourist's and industries (such as shipping and mining) to Michigan's shore's.
The Michigan quarter shows the state's outline and topography, and all five Great Lakes.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:48 pm

2005 West Virginia Quarter

State Nickname - The Mountain State
Capital - Charleston
Statehood - June 20, 1863

West Virginia is the 35th in the 50 State Quarter Program. This coin's image of the New River Gorge, its river, and its bridge, reminds us of the beauty of the "Mountain State."
before gaining statehood, the area that is now West Virginia was part of Virginia. When Virginia announced that it was leaving the Union at the start of the Civil War in 1861, the western part of the state formed the Restored Government of Virginia in Wheeling and drafted a state constitution. Congress was willing to recognize the new state as West Virginia if slavery would be against the law in that state. On June 20, 1863, West Virginia became the nation's 35th state.
The West Virginia design combines the beauty of the Gorge with a Wonder of Engineering. At 3,030 feet long, the New River Gorge Bridge is one of the world's longest steel spans and the second highest bridge in the United States, rising 876 feet above the Gorge. For years, crossing the New River Gorge meant a long trip on narrow, winding mountian roads. The bridge turned the 40 minute detour into a Beautiful 1 Minute Drive.


2005 Kansas Quarter

State Nickname - The Sunflower State
Capital - Topeka
Statehood - January 29, 1861

The State takes it name from the American Indian tribe Called "Kansa" meaning "people of the south wind."
The Kansas quarter features a Buffalo and a Sunflower, two of the state's most beloved symbols. Both the Buffalo and the Sunflower were found throughout Kansas in the mid-1800's when Kansas became a state
The Sunflower is the state flower of Kansas and the basis of its nickname, "The Sunflower State." Sunflowers are among the largest annual flowers around, although they also come in smaller forms. Their seeds nourish several kinds of wildlife as well as people.
The state animal of Kansas, the Buffalo, actually, the American Bison, used to roam throughout North America. There is probably no other animal as closely linked to the American West in the minds of people all over the world. This coin is the second circulating coin of 2005 to carry an image of the Buffalo, the first being a nickel.

[center]2005 Oregon Quarter

State Nickname - The Beaver State
Capital - Salem
Statehood - February 14,1859

Oregon's quarter shows part of Crater Lake the deepest lake in the United States and the seventh deepest in the world. This lake formed in the crater of a former volcano. The Volcano, Mt Mazama, exploded and then caved in more than 7700 years ago, creating a bowl-shaped crater where water collected. In 1994, scientists found the lake's water to be clear to 134 feet deep - a record. The main reason that the water is so clear and blue is that it comes from rain and melting snow rather than from streams and rivers
The scene on Oregon's quarter also shows Wizard Island, an island of Volcanic Ash that rises from the lake. Along the rim of the crater, Watchman Peak and Hillman Peak are also depicted, along witht some of the trees that grow in the area
President Theodore Roosevelt established Crater Lake National Park in 1902, which makes it our nation's sixth-oldest national park. The park provides a home for many animals and plants. It also protects the natural beauty of a place that American Indians from the area have held dear for centuries.


[center]2005 Minnesota Quarter

State Nickname - Land of 10,000 Lakes
Capital - St. Paul
Statehood - May 11, 1858

The Quarter features a lake scene and a textured outline of the State behind it's Nickname 'Land of 10,000 Lakes" The state is actually home to many more lakes than that. The name "Minnesota" comes from the Dakota Sioux word for "Cloudy Water."
The Pine Trees, Lake and People fishing on the coin speak of Minnesota's natural beauty and recreational resources. Floating on the lake is Minnesota's state bird, the loon. By it's name, you might think this bird would be a little..well, loony. But it's actually quite graceful, swift,and beautiful.
The design was announced at the Governor's Fishing Opener, a celebration held every year at the start of the state's tourist season

[center]2005 California Quarter

State Nickname - The Golden State
Capital - Sacramento
Statehood - September 9, 1850

The 31st quarter in the 50 State Quarters Program. For it's design, the Golden State depicts John Muir, the Yosemite Valley, and a soaring California Condor.
John Muir was born in Scotland but grew up in Wisconsin since he was 11. He devoted most of his life to protecting the beauty of nature and published more than 300 articles and 10 books that he wrote on the subject. After Congress established Yosemite National Park in 1890, Muir helped form a club to protect it. Because he was also personally involved in the creation of several other national parks, he earned the nickname "Father of Our National Park System.
The California Condor, with a wingspan as long as 9 feet, is also featured on the coin in a tribute to the successful repopulation of the once nearly extinct bird. In the 1980's, as few as 25 of these enormous birds remained, but thanks to a successful captive breeding program, more than 200 California Condors live in the wild today.

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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:51 pm

2006 South Dakota Quarter

State Nickname - The Mount Rushmore State
Capital - Pierre
Statehood - November 2, 1889

South Dakota is the 40th state admitted into the Union and is the 40th coin in the United States Mint's 50 State Quarter Program.
The South Dakota's quarter features an image of the state bird, a Chinese Ring-Necked Pheasant. Why Chinese? This colorful bird was brought to South Dakota in 1898. Pheasants live mostly in the Midwest, so many other states consider them a delicacy. Wheat, a major crop in South Dakota, decorates the sides of the design.
In the Center of the design is Mount Rushmore, where the busts of 4 American Presidents (George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln) are sculpted. It took 14 years to sculpt Mount Rushmore, a 5,725 foot Peak. The team finished the work in 1941. This famous "Shrine of Democracy," which cost about $1 Million to sculpt, is considered priceless.



2006 North Dakota Quarter

State Nickname - The Peace Garden State
Capital - Bismark
Statehood - November 2, 1889

This is the 39th Quarter in the Series.
As the sun sets in the west, two Bison (American Buffalo) graze the Badlands of the North Dakota Quarter.
the rugged but beautiful Badlands region, with it's buttes (BYOOTS, flat-topped hills) and hoodoos (lumpy stone columns), is part of the Great Plains of Central North America.
President Theodore Roosevelt, a nature lover who owned ranches in North Dakota, founded the US Forest Service and established many National Parks. Later, President Woodrow Wilson founded the National Park Service to save and take care of unspoiled places like the Badlands.
Part of the Badlands is now in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota where animals like Elk, Prairie Dogs, and Bison live. Until the 1860's, huge herds of American Bison roamed free in the Badlands. Although later the animal came close to extinction, more than 400 wild Buffalo now live in the Park.



[center]2006 Colorado Quarter

State Nickname - The Centennial State
Capital - Denver
Statehood - August 1, 1876

The 38th quarter in the series.
The state's name is from the Spanish word for "colored red", referring to the reddish mud in the Colorado River (one of the many colors of "Colorful Colorado"). Above the "Colorful Colorado" banner on the coin, the rugged Rockie Mountains which cross through Colorado, are shown. One of these mountains is Grand Mesa, the largest flat-top mountain in the world. On this 10,000 foot high mesa you can find more than 200 lakes and many miles of hiking trails.
Many nations have flown their flags over parts of Colorado before it was a state, including France, Spain, Mexico, and the Republic of Texas. When the United States bought Louisiana, part of Colorado was included. Between then and statehood, this land changed hands among six different US territories
The boundaries of the Colorado Territory were set when the Territory was created on February 28, 1861, and that's the shape of Colorado today. The 1876 inscribed on the coin is the year Colorado joined the Union, becoming our Nation's 38th state. Because 1876 was also the centennial (100th Anniversary) of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Colorado is nicknamed."Centennial State."



[center]2006 Nebraska Quarter

State Nickname - The Cornhusker State
Capital - Lincoln
Statehood - March 1, 1867

The 37th quarter in the series
Nebraska gets its name from an American Indian word meaning "flat water" after the Platte River that flows through the state ("flat" is one meaning of the French word "platte"). Nebraska's nichname is "The Cornhusker State." Corn, a major product of this state, used to be "husked" (peeled) by hand there before husking machines were invented.
The ox-drawn coverd wagon in the coin's design is carrying a pioneer family westward. Many of the early pioneers passed through Nebraska and Kansas on their way toward California. The Nebraska Territory was formed in 1854 at the same time as the Kansas Territory. You can still see several of the trails that westward travelers used to cross Nebraska. These trails have names like the Oregon Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Lewis and Clark trail, and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail.
Nebraska's quarter also shows Chimney Rock rising from the valley of North Platte river. Chimney Rock, 445 feet tall, was named a National Historic Site in 1956. The Nebraska State Historical Society takes care of the site.



[center]2006 Nevada Quarter

State Nickname - The Silver State
Capital - Carson City
Statehood - October 31, 1864

Wild Mustangs are the main subject of Nevada's quarter the 36th quarter in the series.
Nevada was admitted in to the Union on October 31, 1864. This day (October 31) eventaully became a State Holiday.
Nevada is home to more than half of the nation's wild horses. The horses roam the vast deserts and many mountains of the Great Basin, an area between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. The quarter's design also features the sagebrush, Nevada's state flower.
The name of the state came from it's territorial name, The Nevada Territory, from a word that means "Snow-Capped" in Spanish. The Territory was set up by Congress in 1861, several years after Gold and Silver were found near Virginia City. This discovery helped to earn Nevada the nickname "The Silver State"
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:55 pm

Montana 2007
State Nickname: The Treasure State
State Capital: Helena
Statehood: November 8th 1889

Montana is the 41st state in the quarter program
Montana's Design features its landscape, a bison skull, and one of the State's nicknames "Big sky Country"
The Bison skull reminds us of the rich American Indian heritage of Montana.
Tribes such as the Crow and the Northern cheyenne once lived in this area.
Much of their food, clothing, and shelter came from the large herds of bison that roamed the Great Plains
The bison skull is a symbol seen on many of Montana's schools, businesses, and license plates
Lewis and Clark visited Montana, fur trappers hunted there, and prospectors found gold in this state during the 1860's
Cattle ranchers also made their way west to Montana
Montana means "Mountain" in Spanish, the Rocky Mountains run through the state
There are also plenty of wide open spaces in the "Big sky Country" as well, while its rich mining industry makes it "The Treasure State".



Washington 2007
State nickname: Evergreen State
State Capital: Olympia
Statehood: November 11th 1889

Washington joined the as the 42nd state
The image shows a king salmon jumping out of the water, with Mount Rainier in the background
The salmon is a symbol of Washington and of Pacific Northwest culture
This fish has long nourished the native people of the Pacific Northwest where Washington is located
Mount Rainier, part of the Cascade Range that passes through the state is a volcano covered by snow and glaciers
It hasn't erupted in recent years, but its still considered an active volcano
As a symbol, it seems to connect the eastern and western parts of the State because of its central location
Washington's lush evergreen forests inspired a newspaperman named C.T. Conover to call Washington
"The Evergreen State".
That title later became the state's nickname



[center]Idaho 2007
State Nickname Gem State
State Capital Boise
Statehood July 3rd 1890

The Gem State has chosen the peregrine falcon and an outline of the state as images of its design
The words "Esto Perpetua" make up the state's motto, which is Latin for "May it be Forever".
These words appear on the state seal adopted in 1891
The Peregrin Falcon is one of the fastest-flying birds in the world. It was once on the endangered species list, but because it has been protected it can now be found throughout Idaho and most of the country.
Although the state bird is the mountain bluebird, the peregrine Falcon is the state raptor (bird of prey), chosen in 2004.



[center]Wyoming 2007
State Nickname: Equality State
State Capital: Cheyenne
Statehood: July 10th 1890

The bucking horse and rider symbolize Wyoming's Wild West Heritage "Buffalo Bill" Cody personified this in his traveling Wild West Show. First settled by fur trappers, Wyoming's Fort Laramie later became a place where Pioneers traveling the Oregon Trail liked to stop
Wyoming was nicknamed the "Equality state" because of it's role in granting full voting rights to women. Not only was women's suffrage first practiced in Wyoming, but the state was the first that allowed women to serve on juries and hold public office as well.
The first woman governor of the state was Nellie Tayloe Ross (elected in 1924) Ross later became the first woman to be appointed as the Director of the United States mint, a position she held for 20 years.



[center]Utah 2007
State Nickname: The Beehive State
State Capital: Salt Lake City
Statehood: January 4th 1896

Utah's Quarter features 2 trains facing the golden spike that joined the tracks of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads in 1869 at Promontory, Utah.
The states population grew quickly after the railroad was built and the mining industry blossomed.
Technological changes like the railroad soon caused industry to replace farming as the base of Utah's economy.

The newly-laid track made it possible for people to cross the continent of North America by rail. This was the easiest and cheapest way to travel in the days before cars and airplanes. Linking East to West by train changed both the Utah Territory and the rest of the nation forever, and earned Utah the title "Crossroads of the West"

Utah's governor Jon M. Huntsman, Jr. announced the choice for the quarter design at the 137th anniversary of the Joining of the Railroads at Promontory on May 10th 2006
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:58 pm

Hawaii 2008
Nickname: the Aloha State
Capital: Honolulu
Statehood: August 21, 1959

The fianl quarter of 2008 and the United States Mints 50th state
Honors the 50th state, Hawaii.
This state, spelled "Hawai'i'' in the Hawaiian language, is nicknamed the Aloha State
"Aloha" is a Hawaiian word with many meanings, such as Hello, Goodbye, and Love
The design of Hawaii's quarter features King Kamehameha I stretching his hand toward the eight major Hawaiian islands
The state motto is also inscribed: "UA MAU KE EA O KA AINA I KA PONO,"
which means "The lfie of the land is prepetuated in righteousness

King Kamehaneha I is a central figure in Hawaiian history
In the early 1800's he united the Hawaiian islands into one kingdom while encouraging them to keep to their traditions and ways of life
His Law of the Splintered Paddle, still protects non military citizens during times of war
A statue of King KamehamehaI stands in the National Statuary Hall of the United States Capital building.



Alaska 2008
Nickname: The Last frontier
Capital: Juneau
Statehood: January 3, 1959

The design features a brown bear catching a salmon in a river
A single star stands for the North Star. The phrase "The Great Land" is a translation of the Aleutian word "Alyeska" from which the state gets its name

The bear and salmon remind us of all the beauty and wildlife in this state
The bear also represents strength, and the salmon, the nutrition that provides this strength
Visitors can see brown bears in places like Denali and Katmai National Parks
Most of the brown and grizzly bears of the United States live in Alaska

Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts had lived in Alaska for centureis
Europeans didn't begin to explore the land until 1741. Russia was the first nation to set up a colony in Alaska, claim the land, and trade in furs
When Russia could no longer afford to maintain the colony, it sold Alaska to the United States in 1867 for $7.2 million ( two cents per acre). Even at such a low price, many in the United States called the purchase foolish, but later discoveries of gold and oil on Alaskan soil proved it to be quite a bargain ( not to mention a beautiful place to visit). Alaska became a state in 1959



[center]Arizona 2008
Nickname: Grand Canyon State
Capital: Phoenix
Statehood: February 14, 1912

Halfway through the 2008 releases comes the last of the continental states to join the Union: Arizona
As the 48th state, Arizona's quarter is the 48th quarter in the United States Mints 50 state quarters program
Arizona became a state on February 14th, 1912
The image son the Arizona quarter feature the Grand Canyon and a Saguaro cactus. A banner reading "Grand Canyon State" separates the Canyon from the Cactus, which does not grow in the Grand Canyon
But the flower of the cactus is the state flower of Arizona
The Grand Canyon joined the National Park system in 1919 and is visited by more then four million tourists a year
Covering more than 1 million acres in northwestern Arizona, the Canyon was sculpted by the mighty Colorado River. At its deepest point, the Canyon is 6,000 feet deep, and its gets as wide as 18 miles across, making it one of the seven natural wonders of the world
Several rare and threatened plant and animal species live there.


[center]New Mexico 2008
Nickname: Land of Enchantment
Capital: Santa Fe
Statehood: January 6, 1912

The reverse of New Mexico's quarter features an outline of the state with a topographical texture. The location of the Capital city, Santa Fe, is marked by a Zia Sun Symbol
This symbol, from the Zia Pueblo people, represented the giver of all good. From the central circle, representing life and love without beginning or end, four groups of four rays represent gifts in groups of four: the four directions, the four seasons, the four parts of a day (sunrise, noon, evening, and night), and the four parts of a persons life (Childhood, Youth, Adulthood, and Old Age). Other American Indian cultures have also had great influence on New Mexico, the state nicknamed "Land of Enchantment."



Oklahoma 2008
Nickname: The Sooner State
Capital: Oklahoma City
Statehood: November 16, 1907

The quarters image features the scissor-tailed flycatcher, Oklahoma's state bird. Its tail, as long as its body, is spread open like scissors as it flies. The bird is soaring over the state wildflower, called "Indian Blanket"
The Indian blanket (gaillardia) symbolizes Oklahoma's rich American Indian heritage, its native long grass prairies, and the prairies abundant wildlife
Oklahoma was formed out of the Oklahoma Territory and the Indian Territory of the Five Civilizied Tribes (Choctaw, Cickasaw, Creek, Semonole, and Cherokee). The states name comes from the Choctaw words "okla" and "homma", meaning "red" and "people".
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:00 pm

Constitution Bicentennial Commemorative Silver Dollar (1987)



Flip the Mint Seal here, with the September coin, a Constitution Bicentennial Silver Dollar ... and a tricky question too. Most people think of July 4th as our country's birthday, because that's when the Declaration of Independence was approved. But September 17th is just as important. Do you know why?
It's because September 17, 1787 is the day our Constitution was approved. And the Constitution is the document that stated how our country would be set up and run. Though the Declaration of Independence said we would rule ourselves, it was the Constitution that said how.
Once again, the Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia, this time with James Madison as the main writer. One decision they made was that we would have a president instead of a king. That decision was easy, but the rest were not. The toughest problem was how to give small states as big a "say" as the large ones. It was finally decided that all states would have two senators in the Upper House of Congress, plus a number of representatives based on state population in the Lower House. Despite some opposition, the Constitution was approved in June 1788.
Our Constitution is so important that Congress issued two coins to celebrate its 200th anniversary: a silver dollar and a five dollar gold coin. Eleven sculptors from around the country were invited to submit designs for the silver dollar. The winning design for this coin belonged to Patricia Verani from New Hampshire.

Obverse: A quill pen like the one James Madison used is shown laying on pieces of paper representing the Constitution, with "We the People" written over it.
Reverse: The reverse features a group of people representing all of us whose rights are protected by the Constitution.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:00 pm

1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial Half Dollar


This month's coin is special for sure, and in lots of ways. First of all, what it honors is not so much a document, like the Declaration of Independence or the Constitution, but a policy (a statement about what to do as a nation) called the Monroe Doctrine.
The Monroe Doctrine said, basically, that nations on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean should stay separate. At the time it was issued (December of 1823), some European nations were talking about starting new colonies in the Americas or trying to regain control of countries there that had just become independent. The Doctrine said the United States was willing to stand up for these countries and, at the same time, stay out of European affairs unless they were dangerous for American nations.
In creating this policy, President James Monroe had help from his Secretary of State, John Quincy Adams, and that's why both men are pictured on the coin. In October, Monroe had written to his Virginia neighbor, former president Thomas Jefferson, to ask his advice. Jefferson agreed with the policy. President Monroe's doctrine, part of a talk he gave to Congress, set our nation's foreign policy for many years afterward.
Another special thing about this coin is the image on the back. In place of a simple image of the North and South American continents, the artist showed two women posed to look like the continents! Pretty cool, huh? The major ocean currents are shown flowing around these figures.
There's also a city name that you don't see on a coin very often: Los Angeles, the home of the motion picture company that asked for the coin to be made, and the city where it was no doubt first sold. Between the dates in the lower left, you can see a quill pen in front of a scroll, suggesting the Monroe Doctrine. There's also a triple ridge around the rim, another feature you don't see often. All these things add up to one special half dollar!

Obverse: On the front: busts of two presidents, James Monroe and John Quincy Adams. Adams was Secretary of State at the time.
Reverse: The figures-shaped-as-continents design had already been used in other places, like a seal for the Pan-American Exposition of 1901. The major ocean currents are also shown.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:03 pm

Presidential Dollars

2007 George Washington Dollar (Coin)

On the front of the Coin features his portrait, name, and years the President's term began and ended. An image of the Statue of Liberty is on the back of the coins.
The Edge of the Coins have in "God We Trust" "E. Pluribus Unum" and the Coins Date of issue.

After the Constitution of the United States went into effect, George Washington was elected to serve as the first President of the United States. This former Commander-In-Chief of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War werved 2 terms as President, from 1789 to 1797.
President Washington held the country's first Cabinet meeting, this Cabinet included Alexander Hamilton, our first secretary of the Treasury and Thomas Jefferson, the first Secretary of State.
President Washington himself laid the cornerstone for the United States Capitol building in
Washington Dc, on September 18, 1793
He also appointed the first Director of the United States Mint, David Rittenhouse, in 1792

Statue of Liberty

The law calls for an image of the Statue of Liberty to stand for the idea of liberty. People all over the world know the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of liberty and freedom in the United States. In 1886 President Grover Cleveland accepted the Statue of Liberty from France and said. "We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home"

France gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States 110 years after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The statue symbolizes the friendship that grew between America and France during the American Revolutionary War.
The Statue of Liberty Facts
151 foot tall monument was sculpted by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. The sculptor had help from the designer of the Eiffel Tower, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, in figuring out how to hold up such a huge structure

Finished in 1884, the statue was taken apart and shipped in 350 pieces
Reassembling her took 4 months
The tablet she holds in her left hand carries the inscription "July IV MDCCLXXVI, the date in Roman numerals (July 4, 1776) when the Declaration of Independence was signed
The 7 spikes of her crown are rays that symbolize both the light of the sun and the 7 seas and 7 continents of the world
To celebrate her 100th anniversary, the Statue of Liberty was the subject of a US commemorative coin in 1986. In 1997 she appeared on the new American Eagle Platinum coins.

to read more www.usmint.gov
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:03 pm

2007 John Adams Dollar (Coin)

On the front of the Coin features his portrait, name, and years the President's term began and ended. An image of the Statue of Liberty is on the back of the coins.
The Edge of the Coins have in "God We Trust" "E. Pluribus Unum" and the Coins Date of issue.

John Adams was born in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1735, He graduated from Harvard University to become a lawyer, then represented Massachusetts in both the First and Second Continental Congresses.
Adams was one of the first to speak out in favor of independence for the American Colonies.
During the Revolution, Adams used his skills as a diplomat to represent the United States government in France and Holland. He helped to convince other countries to support American Independence.
Then he served 8 years as Vice President under George Washington before being elected President himself in 1797.
John Adams was the first President to live in the White House, arriving in Washington on November 1, 1800.


Statue of Liberty

The law calls for an image of the Statue of Liberty to stand for the idea of liberty. People all over the world know the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of liberty and freedom in the United States. In 1886 President Grover Cleveland accepted the Statue of Liberty from France and said. "We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home"

France gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States 110 years after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The statue symbolizes the friendship that grew between America and France during the American Revolutionary War.
The Statue of Liberty Facts
151 foot tall monument was sculpted by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. The sculptor had help from the designer of the Eiffel Tower, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, in figuring out how to hold up such a huge structure

Finished in 1884, the statue was taken apart and shipped in 350 pieces
Reassembling her took 4 months
The tablet she holds in her left hand carries the inscription "July IV MDCCLXXVI, the date in Roman numerals (July 4, 1776) when the Declaration of Independence was signed
The 7 spikes of her crown are rays that symbolize both the light of the sun and the 7 seas and 7 continents of the world
To celebrate her 100th anniversary, the Statue of Liberty was the subject of a US commemorative coin in 1986. In 1997 she appeared on the new American Eagle Platinum coins.

to read more www.usmint.gov
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:04 pm

2007 Thomas Jefferson Dollar (Coin)

On the front of the Coin features his portrait, name, and years the President's term began and ended. An image of the Statue of Liberty is on the back of the coins.
The Edge of the Coins have in "God We Trust" "E. Pluribus Unum" and the Coins Date of issue.

Thomas Jefferson was not known for speaking in public. In fact he was sometimes called the "silent member" of the Continental Congress where he represented Virginia, his home state
But he was certainly good with a pen. Among his other writings, Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence.
After serving as America's foreign minister to France, he was elected this country's 3rd President. He led the way in the purchase of Louisiana from France in 1803. doubling the country's land area


Statue of Liberty

The law calls for an image of the Statue of Liberty to stand for the idea of liberty. People all over the world know the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of liberty and freedom in the United States. In 1886 President Grover Cleveland accepted the Statue of Liberty from France and said. "We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home"

France gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States 110 years after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The statue symbolizes the friendship that grew between America and France during the American Revolutionary War.
The Statue of Liberty Facts
151 foot tall monument was sculpted by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. The sculptor had help from the designer of the Eiffel Tower, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, in figuring out how to hold up such a huge structure

Finished in 1884, the statue was taken apart and shipped in 350 pieces
Reassembling her took 4 months
The tablet she holds in her left hand carries the inscription "July IV MDCCLXXVI, the date in Roman numerals (July 4, 1776) when the Declaration of Independence was signed
The 7 spikes of her crown are rays that symbolize both the light of the sun and the 7 seas and 7 continents of the world
To celebrate her 100th anniversary, the Statue of Liberty was the subject of a US commemorative coin in 1986. In 1997 she appeared on the new American Eagle Platinum coins.

to read more www.usmint.gov
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:05 pm

2007 James Madison Dollar (Coin)

On the front of the Coin features his portrait, name, and years the President's term began and ended. An image of the Statue of Liberty is on the back of the coins.
The Edge of the Coins have in "God We Trust" "E. Pluribus Unum" and the Coins Date of issue.

James Madison studied both history and law at Princeton University (then called the College of New Jersey). Afterward, he returned to Virginia to help craft Virginia's Constitution and to help lead the Virginia Assembly.
After the American Revolution, Madison played a major role in setting the course for the new country and its government. Madison helped write the Federalist Papers, a series of 85 essays that encouraged people to accept the United States Constitution and make it law. He urged Congress to pass the Bill of Rights as well
When Madison became President, France and Great Britain were at war. He had to ask Congress to declare war on Great Britain, resulting in the War of 1812

Statue of Liberty

The law calls for an image of the Statue of Liberty to stand for the idea of liberty. People all over the world know the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of liberty and freedom in the United States. In 1886 President Grover Cleveland accepted the Statue of Liberty from France and said. "We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home"

France gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States 110 years after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain. The statue symbolizes the friendship that grew between America and France during the American Revolutionary War.
The Statue of Liberty Facts
151 foot tall monument was sculpted by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. The sculptor had help from the designer of the Eiffel Tower, Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, in figuring out how to hold up such a huge structure

Finished in 1884, the statue was taken apart and shipped in 350 pieces
Reassembling her took 4 months
The tablet she holds in her left hand carries the inscription "July IV MDCCLXXVI, the date in Roman numerals (July 4, 1776) when the Declaration of Independence was signed
The 7 spikes of her crown are rays that symbolize both the light of the sun and the 7 seas and 7 continents of the world
To celebrate her 100th anniversary, the Statue of Liberty was the subject of a US commemorative coin in 1986. In 1997 she appeared on the new American Eagle Platinum coins.

to read more www.usmint.gov
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:06 pm

2008 Martin Van Buren


was the first president who was born an America citizen, the first from the state of New York, and the first whose parents were Dutch rather than British. His interest in politics began at his father’s tavern in Kinderhook, New York, where politicians like Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr would stop as they traveled.
He served in the United States Senate and was governor of New York before he became Andrew Jackson’s secretary of state. He served as vice president during Jackson’s second term and was easily elected president in 1837.
Rather than allowing federal funds to be held in a national bank or even in state banks, Van Buren insisted on creating a federal treasury system for that purpose. He also headed off disagreements with Great Britain, keeping the country out of war. But an economic depression had taken hold soon after he entered office and it lasted for most of his term. He lost the election to a second term in 1841.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:07 pm

2008 Andrew Jackson

was the first president elected from a state west of the Appalachian Mountains (Tennessee). At the age of 13, he served a South Carolina regiment during the Revolutionary War. Jackson later became famous as a hero of the War of 1812. His sternness as a commander earned him the nickname “Old Hickory.”
As president, Jackson worked to strengthen the executive branch and vetoed more bills than the six prior presidents combined. He was chosen to run for a second term, but in a different way from previous presidents. Instead of Congress holding a special meeting to pick a candidate, Jackson’s party held a convention. Jackson was elected for a second term.
He strongly believed in the power of the federal government over states’ rights so the country could stay united. During Jackson’s term, Congress enacted a tariff on certain goods. When one state didn’t agree with the tariff, Jackson took a strong stand against the state’s refusal to pay.
President Jackson authorized three new branches of the United States Mint in 1835. The branches were opened in the Southern cities of New Orleans (Louisiana), Charlotte (North Carolina), and Dahlonega (Georgia).
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:08 pm

2008 John Quincy Adams

The sixth President of the United States, John Quincy Adams grew up in the world of politics. His parents were Abigail Adams and her husband John, the nation’s second president. As a child, John Quincy often went to Europe with his father, who served as a diplomat there during the American Revolution. He became a diplomat himself, and eventually president as well.
Adams’s election was only by a slim margin. It was finally decided in the House of Representatives by one vote. As president, Adams helped to boost the economy and make it easier to trade among the states by setting up a system of roads and canals. For example, the Cumberland Road was extended into Ohio.
Adams ran for a second term as president, but lost the election. He then went on to serve in the House of Representatives for nine terms! He and the 17th president, Andrew Johnson, are the only two former presidents (so far) who later served in Congress.
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:08 pm

2008 James Monroe

Virginia native James Monroe was overwhelmingly elected the 5th President of the United States in 1817. Monroe, you see, fought in the Revolutionary War; supported the Bill of Rights; and served as a US diplomat in Europe, as governor of Virginia, as senator, as secretary of state, as secretary of war, and as a negotiator of the Louisiana Purchase. His experience made him an excellent candidate for the presidency.
Under his administration, the country enjoyed peace and a healthy economy. As a result, the years of his two terms are known as the “era of good feelings.”
As president, Monroe laid the foundation for American foreign policy in an 1823 message to Congress. This policy, which warned European powers against expanding in the Western Hemisphere, became known as the Monroe Doctrine.
To keep the balance between free states and slave states, he helped devise the Missouri Compromise. The Compromise also set a boundary line across the country. Above that line (36 degrees 30 feet north latitude), no Louisiana territory could introduce slavery
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PostSubject: Re: The Depository   Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:09 pm

2005 Marine Corps 230th Anniversary Silver Dollar


But maybe you never heard of the Continental Marines. Congress created this service in November of 1775 to help the colonies fight the Revolutionary War. The Marines mostly fought in places like the Bahamas, where only ships could go. But they also fought on the mainland. For instance, they fought alongside the Continental Army in the second battle of Trenton in 1776.
And did you know that our Revolution was not fought only on American soil? In 1778, some Marines under John Paul Jones raided Great Britain! Twice!
After the Revolutionary War ended, America sold all its war ships and put an end to the Continental Marines and the Continental Navy. Now here's that big July: In July of 1798, Congress and President John Adams brought the Continental Marines back with the name we know it by today: The United States Marine Corps.
During World War II, Allied forces set out to recapture the Pacific islands that the Japanese had taken. The last island left to recapture was Iwo Jima. When soldiers raised the American flag on Iwo Jima, a photographer captured the event. The photograph was used as a model for the sculpture that became the Marine Corps War Memorial. The famous photograph was also used to create the obverse image on this commemorative coin.
In its 230 years, the Marine Corps has fought for American freedom and peace all over the world. The Corps' motto is "Always Faithful," which in Latin is "Semper Fidelis"...or, as the Marines like to say, "Semper Fi!"
Obverse: This image commemorates the raising of the American flag over Iwo Jima during World War II.
Reverse: This side shows the well-known insignia of the United States Marines.
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